Debby Ryan on Her Hit Show and Upcoming Debut Album

Even if she wasn’t famous, Debby Ryan would be a cool girl. You know the type: Smart (see her charming Tumblr), funny (see her hilariously witty tweets), and she can rock ball gowns and band tees with the same aplomb. The actress-slash-singer is totally BFF-worthy, and she just so happens to be real-life besties with half of youngHollywood.

But Debby is famous, and deservedly so—the Disney star has acted on loads of hit series (remember The Suite Life?), the latest beingJessie, which kicks off its third season this summer.

We stole a few minutes with the 20-year-old to chat about movies, music, and making it big on the small-screen.

What can we expect from season three of Jessie?
Disney has never done a show with someone who starts out so grown-up̬Jessie’s 18! She’s still trying to figure out what kind of career she wants, so she’s trying different things and attempting to move forward and really advance as an actor. More than anything, it’s about watching her grow.

You’re going through a lot of the same things are your character. Do you influence the storylines at all?
I think that’s where we get half the inspiration for the show, just saying, “Okay, Debby, what’s going on with you right now?” I’m doing what Jessie’s doing. She’s moving forward, and life is changing and shifting around her. All the stories about her family and her relationships—all of those personal things—are totally typical of someone that age.

You’ve been on TV for years now. Are movies next for you?
It’s funny—for a lot of people, features are the dream, and they’re like, “When life settles down, maybe I’ll go to TV.” For me, it’s the opposite. I’ve really fallen in love with television. TV acting is a great skill to have, and it’s nice to have that stability.

But you’re into movies and music too, right?
I can do a little bit of everything, which is such a blessing. I have an amazing team of people around me. They don’t come to me and say “You should really do this, or you should reallyconsider that.” It’s, “Do you care about this project? Do you really want to do this? If not, don’t push it.” Acting and the industry of making movies is beautiful, but it’s so exhausting and suchhard work, if you don’t absolutely 100% want to do something, it defeats the purpose. You haveto want to do it and choose things that are worth fighting for. A career is not as much defined by things you say “yes” to as much as things you say “no” to.

You’re also recording an album! What should we expect from that?
I wouldn’t do the music thing if it weren’t for my brother, who’s a producer. He understands me and helps my vision come to life. I want to tell stories, and I want to tell them in the right way. He helps me do that. For the longest time, I was afraid to be a Disney girl who does music. It’s like, I love those girls. Those girls are my favorite. But it didn’t feel like me! Music is such an intensely personal thing for me, and I knew if I was going to do it, it would be in my own way.

What does it sound like?
There’s a little bit of everything. There are ukeleles and screaming guitars and loud drums and fun piano. It really is a fun record that’s about experiencing every shade of life.

You also manage to do a lot of charity work, too! What are you doing right now?
I’m an ambassador for Disney’s Friends for Change, and I asked them if there’s anything we can do to help little girls in India get education and a better quality of life, because that’s important to me. A few months later they introduced me to an incredible charity called Free the Children, which helps young people empower other young people. They recently partnered with Amwayto look for changemakers who are positively affecting their communities and, therefore, the world.

You always look awesome on the red carpet. Are you into fashion?
It’s such an exciting subplot of what I do. I’m blessed because get to tell stories and help people, but I also get to step out and wear cool things and tell people who I am. I’m inspired by street style and Teen Vogue. I love band tees and pearl earrings!

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Justin Bieber Accused Of Being A Baby’s Daddy AGAIN!!

Justin Bieber‘s baby daddy drama continues!

Another woman has stepped forward and is claiming the Die in your Arms singer is the father of her two year-old daughter after they knocked boots in Miami way back in 2010, when he was ONLY 15!!!

The European woman is choosing to keep her identity under wraps, but a source close to her says she’s 100% sure the Biebs is the daddy:

“She gave birth to a baby girl later that year, and Justin didn’t know anything about it. She just wanted to protect her baby. She wanted to keep her and her family away from any spotlight.”

Although the woman in question is coming forward about her baby, she says she has no plans on pursuing legal action against Justin:

“She won’t be asking for a penny form him, and she has no desire to become part of the celebrity lifestyle. She’s going to leave it up to Justin to decide, at any point in the future that he chooses, if he ever wants to get involved with the child.”

This isn’t the first time that he’s been tied to paternity issues, asMariah Yeater also accused the pop singer of fathering her child just a couple of years ago, but she eventually dropped her lawsuit!

Sources close to Bieber are once again saying there is NO truth behind these claims! That’s probably a good thing too, because the closest thing Justin’s ever had to a child was his pet monkey, and we all know how that turned out! LOLz!!

 

Google’s Schmidt: Teens’ mistakes will never go away

Speaking at a festival in the U.K., Google’s executive chairman offers that the things teens do now will stay with them forever, by way of the Web. He also suggested some people are sharing too much online.

When you search “teens do stupid things” on YouTube, you get a treasure trove.

(Credit: BFvsGF/YouTube screenshot by Chris Matyszczyk/CNET)

It must be peculiar for children of the Internet age.

They are the first to have a complete record of their whole lives. They are the first who’ll be able to offer concrete proof of every one of their days, friends, and actions.

Eric Schmidt worries, however, that they’ll be the first who’ll never be allowed to forget their mistakes.

As the Telegraph reports, Schmidt spoke Saturday at the Hay Festival in the U.K. and offered some sobering thoughts for those addled by online life.

He said: “There are situations in life that it’s better that they don’t exist. Especially if there is stuff you did when you were a teenager. Teenagers are now in an adult world online.”

Some days, you could hardly describe most of what happens online as “adult.” Still, Schmidt says he believes the online world has gone too far in forcing teens to never forget.

In bygone times, he said, they were punished, but allowed to grow beyond youthful indiscretions.

Some might wonder that teenagers aren’t punished enough these days, so the online world acts as a peculiar corrective.

However, my own worry is the use of the word “mistake.”

This is a word that is always couched in certainty, but often has a highly fluctuating meaning.

A word or an act can seem like a mistake when it happens — and even shortly afterward. In years to come, though, you might look back on it and see that, though it created friction and even hurt at the time, it served a higher and more character-forming purpose in the long run.

Supposed mistakes can lead you down paths that you never would have otherwise traveled. You end up discovering things about yourself and what makes you happy that may have otherwise never been found.

 

Calling one’s boss “a raving buck-toothed lunatic, with the management skills of a deaf hyena and the talent of an oaf’s corpse” might get you fired — or even ostracized for a while.

Yet the courage that might have taken could serve to bolster an otherwise compliant spirit and project you to higher goals and achievements.

Similarly, a teenager who is digitally captured engaging in one of the thousands of indiscretions to which teenagers have mental and physical access — say, putting toilet cleaner and aluminum foil in a water bottle — might have to suffer for it in the short term.

In years to come, however, that might seem merely a fond and hearty reminder of how absurd life (and people) can be. It might also show an aspect of character that some might not immediately spot.

It’s true that, as Schmidt said in his speech, people are now sharing too much. He gave the example of future parents posting ultrasounds of their unborn babies.

But part of the problem that teens might encounter in the future comes not from their having made supposed mistakes. It’s from those who might choose to judge them for those supposed mistakes.

As ever in life, the opinions of others — especially in the sheep pen that is the Web — can be the most mistaken and most damaging distortion of all.